Back Issue

26.5

On the cover: Tyler Thornsley, traversing the thin line between disaster and delight at Wedge. Features inside the book chart the mirrored perfection of twin African points, dissect the foundational surfing of Oxnard’s Russ Short, and enjoin a string of clip hunts across Iceland, Mexico, and the Maldives with the likes of Steph Gilmore and Ryan Burch. Digital disruptions on the Victorian Coast of Oz, high-resolution slide film on Oahu’s North Shore, and the “death of print” in the surf media are variously discussed.

Back Issue

26.5

On the cover: Tyler Thornsley, traversing the thin line between disaster and delight at Wedge. Features inside the book chart the mirrored perfection of twin African points, dissect the foundational surfing of Oxnard’s Russ Short, and enjoin a string of clip hunts across Iceland, Mexico, and the Maldives with the likes of Steph Gilmore and Ryan Burch. Digital disruptions on the Victorian Coast of Oz, high-resolution slide film on Oahu’s North Shore, and the “death of print” in the surf media are variously discussed.

Features
Photo by Craig Fineman

“Short was a member of a band of outsiders. He soon shone as the brightest, the most talented, and the most soulful adept in the Bonzer cult. Nevertheless, he somehow seemed to slip through the pages, into obscurity.”

Page 22

THE INFLUENCER

In the 1970s, Oxnard’s Russ Short laid the roots for a new era of California style and performance. Then he was lost to history.

Photo by Andreas Jaritz

Page 34

COASTAL SURVEY

Voices and faces from the surf frontiers of Africa, from Morocco to Senegal.

Art by Mike Salisbury

Page 48

“LET’S DO IT!”

The life and death of Surfing magazine.

Photo by Chris Gentile

Page 58

GET CLIP

Stacking footage in Iceland, Mexico, and the Maldives with Ryan Burch, Creed McTaggart, Steph Gilmore, and the rest of the cast of Self-Discovery for Social Survival.

Photo by Philip Mauro

Page 66

SEA MEMORY

Fine artist Mary Heilmann.

Photo by Alan Van Gysen

Page 74

THE AFRICAN COINFLIP

Mirroring points in Namibia and Mozambique lure African surfers. Heads you bake, tails you freeze.

Photo by Lance Trout

Page 84

CALL ME AT THE CRACK OF NOON

North Shore photographer Shirley Rogers stands alone.

Photo by Ed Sloane

“I think about digital disruption all the time. I started shooting in 2009 so this is all I know. You get exposed to so many disposable images on social media. But there will always be a home for classic images.”

Page 98

PORTFOLIO: ED SLOANE

A young shooter from Australia’s Victorian Coast in the time of Instagram

Back Issue

26.4

On the cover: “Water is the New Black,” 18x24-inch screen print by Shepard Fairey. Renderings inside the book frame the combat and surf photography of photojournalist Nic Bothma, sketch in the dimensions of Skip Frye’s personal quiver, and go horseback on an expedition through the wilds of Chile. Long reads by Kimball Taylor (on the current state of bodyboarding) and Jamie Brisick (with a haunting essay on love, death, and Brazilian shore-pound) add depth and shading.

Back Issue

26.4

On the cover: “Water is the New Black,” 18x24-inch screen print by Shepard Fairey. Renderings inside the book frame the combat and surf photography of photojournalist Nic Bothma, sketch in the dimensions of Skip Frye’s personal quiver, and go horseback on an expedition through the wilds of Chile. Long reads by Kimball Taylor (on the current state of bodyboarding) and Jamie Brisick (with a haunting essay on love, death, and Brazilian shore-pound) add depth and shading.

Features
Photo by Brian Nevins

“This is boat-required surfing. I won’t say exactly how far offshore we are, but it’s out of sight of land. If something bad happened, the Coast Guard might get to you in time. Or they might not.”

PAGE 22

The Down East Skiff Trip

A New England seamount discovery.

Photo by Matty Hannon

“We knew nothing about horses, couldn’t even mount them properly. There was so much to learn, beginning with how to prevent them from snapping ropes, destroying pack rigging, and galloping for the hills whenever we brought a surfboard anywhere near them.”

PAGE 32

Pack and Saddle

Down the Chilean coast a la jinete.

Photo by Leroy Bellet

PAGE 42

The Big Boogie

Despite their labeling as “pests” and “lessers,” bodyboarders continue to charge, innovate, and pack barrels, often in obscurity.

Photo by Peter Green

PAGE 56

Expat Days

When photographer Peter Green left California for Australia in 1972, he wasn’t fleeing anything. He just never came back.

Photo by Nic Bothma

PAGE 66

War and Waves

Deep into the cave with combat and surf photojournalist Nic Bothma.

Photo by Shawn Parkin

PAGE 76

The Caretaker of Intangible Ingredients

The personal quiver of San Diego’s Harry “Skip” Frye.

Photo by John Florence

“I’m bodysurfing the north end of Barra da Tijuca, a spot called Praia do Pepê. I am not thinking about death explicitly, but death hangs over all of this.”

PAGE 92

The Dazzling Blackness

Life and loss, viewed through the lens of thumping shorebreak.

Photo by Sacha Specker

PAGE 100

Portfolio: Play the Hits

Recent photography from TSJ’s working archive.

Back Issue

26.3

On the cover: Dino Adrian, helicopter angle, Injidup, Western Australia. Planes of focus inside the book alight on the multi-disciplined surfing of Justin Quintal, reveal Michael Halsband’s NYC photo studio, and unearth a trove of 60s era North Shore imagery from Val Valentine. Supporting action provided by the likes of Dane Reynolds, Craig Anderson, and Dion Agius in South Oz, plus the Millennial subject matter of lensman Duncan Macfarlane.

Back Issue

26.3

On the cover: Dino Adrian, helicopter angle, Injidup, Western Australia. Planes of focus inside the book alight on the multi-disciplined surfing of Justin Quintal, reveal Michael Halsband’s NYC photo studio, and unearth a trove of 60s era North Shore imagery from Val Valentine. Supporting action provided by the likes of Dane Reynolds, Craig Anderson, and Dion Agius in South Oz, plus the Millennial subject matter of lensman Duncan Macfarlane.

Features
Photo by Jeff Divine

PAGE 22

DREAM ON

The strobing, hallucinatory visuals of 70s-era artist Glenn Chase.

Photo by Dave Nelson

“Of course this is heresy to the surf industry, which has historically revered the ‘core’ among all else, and which has its origin story rooted deeply in surfers making products for surfers by surfers.”

PAGE 30

RIDERS OF THE ’STORM

Behold: the mass produced, Costco-bought Wavestorm, the best-selling surfboard in the world.

Photo by Kenny Hurtado

PAGE 38

BUILDERS OF THE NORTH

Pine trees, wood hewn vehicles, and cobblestone reefs in British Columbia with Jay Nelson, Derrick Disney, and Danny Hess.

Photo by Elli Thor Magnusson

“He practiced drop knees and nose riding on prog logs. This was a time when anything over six foot was frowned upon, unless it carried an old-timer. Yet it was clear he had a natural talent for that kind of surfing—for the balletic, paced approach longboarding demanded.”

PAGE 50

NORMCORE

Equipment polymath Justin Quintal and his multifaceted wave-sliding.

Photo Courtesy of Val Valentine Collection Trust

PAGE 60

A FRIEND OF A FRIEND

Wrestling commentator, photographer, and Sunset Beach denizen Val Valentine was a fixture among the 1960s North Shore community.

Photo by John Respondek

“Three of the most high-profile surfers in the world, with access to everything performance-earned money and fame can buy. All the more reason to drop the trappings, get scared, and sleep in the dirt.”

PAGE 70

SUPER CREW

Dane Reynolds, Craig Anderson, and Dion Agius duck out of modernity and into an unnamed slab in the Outback.

Photo by Gabriel Thompson

PAGE 78

NORTH OF MADISON

At home with Hasselblad master Michael Halsband.

Photo by Seth Stafford

“My movements were governed by how the trade winds interacted with the coastline. The east: raw, mountainous, onshore. The west: developed, sheltered, offshore. There were exceptions, like the calmness of the twilight hour, or bends in the wind direction that favored certain angles.”

PAGE 88

THE PLURAL ISLAND

One Barbados, various coasts, reefs, peoples, and pockets.

Photo by Duncan Macfarlane

PAGE 98

THE MILLENNIAL SHOOTER

On assignment or self-directed, the results of Duncan Macfarlane’s work yield images that are mind-surf worthy.

Back Issue

26.2

On the cover: From a deep surfing family to just…deep, Mikala Jones self-documents the inner recesses of an Indonesian cavern. Additional explorations in the book trace performance surfing into the prehistoric era, investigate the fast life and sudden death of New York surfer/hustler Rick Rasmussen, and range from the Chocolate Islands of São Tomé to the glacial estuaries of Iceland.

Back Issue

26.2

On the cover: From a deep surfing family to just…deep, Mikala Jones self-documents the inner recesses of an Indonesian cavern. Additional explorations in the book trace performance surfing into the prehistoric era, investigate the fast life and sudden death of New York surfer/hustler Rick Rasmussen, and range from the Chocolate Islands of São Tomé to the glacial estuaries of Iceland.

Features
Photo by Brent Bielmann/A-Frame

Who can say when riding sideways on an unbroken wave face began? Even on shorter bellyboard-style surfboards, used at the base of the Polynesian Triangle, it seems unlikely that surfers wouldn’t have flirted with going lala.

PAGE 22

GOING LALA

Did some Hawaiian gremmie stomp-stall his alaia in say, 800 A.D. at a river mouth suck-bank? The dawn of performance surfing may be older than you think.

Photo by Chris Burkard

PAGE 34

GLACIAL RELATIONSHIPS

High above the Iceland’s longest river, photographer Chris Burkard tracks sandbar waves to their glacial headwaters.

Photo by Jeff Divine

PAGE 46

SOUNDINGS: ROCKER

Six shapers. One design element. Parsing the most elusive characteristic of surfboard design.

Photo by D.J. Struntz

PAGE 58

THE LOVER’S GUIDE TO SURF CINEMA

Joe Guglielmino (most commonly referred to as Joe G., or Joseph G., but never just Joe) is a surf filmmaker who occupies a very central position in surf film’s Valhalla.

Photo by Greg Ewing

“We had heard about São Tomé’s surf scene and expected to find these local surfers. We had not expected to find them busting airs.”

PAGE 66

THE CHOCOLATE ISLANDS

Located 200 miles from the mainland in the Gulf of Guinea, São Tomé has a homegrown wave-riding culture fostered by its locals, both past and present.

Photo by Jeff Divine

PAGE 76

UNSAFE AT ANY SPEED

New York surf legend Rick Rasmussen was one of the best surfers of his generation. A U.S. Champion by the age of 19, he was dead by 27, shot in a drug deal gone wrong in Harlem.

Art by Jonathan Zawada

PAGE 92

GALLERY

The distortionist design work of Jonathan Zawada.

Photo by Al Mackinnon

“I can’t say much except to mention that I’ve done several trips to this location and, on most occasions, my friends and I were the only surfers in the area.”

PAGE 98

PORTFOLIO: WARMING IN THE HORSEBOX

Surveying the files of British-Isles-based photographer Al Mackinnon.

Back Issue

26.1

On the Cover: Prepared for a welcome and bracing shock, 19-year-old Lloyd Kahn makes the leap in Santa Cruz, 1955. Features inside include Jon Foster’s archive of Windansea imagery, a visit to Cloud Nine in the Philippines, a cold-case file on a man named Mr. X and his contributions to edge-board design, plus short fiction from Bryan Di Salvatore. More bounty inside.

Back Issue

26.1

On the Cover: Prepared for a welcome and bracing shock, 19-year-old Lloyd Kahn makes the leap in Santa Cruz, 1955. Features inside include Jon Foster’s archive of Windansea imagery, a visit to Cloud Nine in the Philippines, a cold-case file on a man named Mr. X and his contributions to edge-board design, plus short fiction from Bryan Di Salvatore. More bounty inside.

Features
Photo by Morgan Maassen

“And now she’s ignoring her shrimp ceviche and now I have mustard dripping down my chin, dark circles under my eyes, hell in my stomach. I could spill thousands of words on her past.”

PAGE 22

A Graceful and Perfumed Rage

Teenaged runaway. Performance pioneer. Lifetime surf obsessive. The contemporary take on Lisa Andersen.

Photo by John Foster

“Looking back through the photographs, it is the place itself, awash in the zeitgeist of the day that emerges as the one indispensible personality, the friend who brought everyone together.”

PAGE 32

Neptune Alley

Jon Foster’s 1970s Windansea.

Photo by Tommy Schultz

“The island is now confronted with a contemporary stumbling block that plagues many Third World tourist destinations—rampant, unchecked development. I wondered what the next five years would hold.”

PAGE 44

The Maturation of Cloud Nine

The Philippines in the age of investment.

Photo by Corey Wilson

Page 56

Case Study

A 14-image representation of a top-tier Californian shooter’s recent work.

Courtesy of the Author's Collection

PAGE 76

You Never Give Me Your Money

The lost work and unsold paintings of surf-art pioneer Michael Dormer.

Photo by Cher Pendarvis

PAGE 84

Edge Boards and the Mysterious Mr. X

The quest for speed at the dawn of the Shortboard Revolution (and other adventures in low drag).

Photo by Alan Van Gysen

PAGE 96

Heavy-Sea Rating

Yacht-builder Jonathan Paarman imbues his craft with wave-inspired designs.

Photo by Kenny Hurtado

“He thought of an ancient wharf—he had seen it in his dreams—surrounded by yellow-toothed rats, themselves stalked by gargoyle fish fanning their preposterous fins, waiting in the wetdark below him.”

PAGE 108

Nineteen Ways of Looking at a Wave

Our second excerpt from the novel-in-progress, I Still Miss Someone.

Back Issue

25.6

On the cover: West Oz hydrodynamics. Other liquid inquiries in this issue include Butch Van Artsdalen’s capers on Oahu during the 60s, Scum Valley legend Ant Corrigan’s impact on progressive surfing during the 70s, Maurice Cole and Tom Curren’s reverse vee project in France during the 90s, plus contemporary notes from the Chatham Islands, a gallery from the northlands of America and Europe, and an examination of how one board served as a window into modern surf culture.

Back Issue

25.6

On the cover: West Oz hydrodynamics. Other liquid inquiries in this issue include Butch Van Artsdalen’s capers on Oahu during the 60s, Scum Valley legend Ant Corrigan’s impact on progressive surfing during the 70s, Maurice Cole and Tom Curren’s reverse vee project in France during the 90s, plus contemporary notes from the Chatham Islands, a gallery from the northlands of America and Europe, and an examination of how one board served as a window into modern surf culture.

Features
Mark McInnis

PAGE 100

Portfolio: Mark McInnis

The microcosms of a gelid-eyed lensman.

The older I get and the longer I stay in places like this, the more I realize their potential for photography. In the past, I’d never think about it. This is where I grew up. Back then, we’d just hang out—shoot guns, snowboard, ride motorcycles, fish, whatever. Today, I appreciate it 100 percent. Mark McInnis
John Pennings

PAGE 34

Some Minor Windfalls

Mid-60s snaps from the Lucky Country, courtesy of John Pennings.

Tom Servais

PAGE 24

The Reverse Vee Project

Tom Curren, Maurice Cole, “the turn,” and other outtakes from a happy design accident.

People think hindsight brings wisdom but it also obscures our ability to understand how things actually happen. A board like the 7'8" pintail that Maurice Cole shaped for Tom Curren in late 1991 looks like the predictable outcome of an inevitable collaboration. Peel back the years, though, and something quite different emerges. Nick Carroll
Rambo Estrada

PAGE 80

Not Surfing In The Chatham Islands

“Before the word surf has left your mouth the word shark is already forming on the local’s lips.”

AITIONN

PAGE 60

The Man From Scum Valley

Bondi legend Ant Corrigan might have been the greatest surfer of his generation.

Avid Studio

PAGE 48

Spirit of the Green Dragon

Ceramicist Joe Skoby and the ghosts of La Jolla’s arts colonies.

You’re taking this lump of clay and it’s spinning and moving and you need to control that spin and movement, and its all about curves, like bottom turns and top turns. The clay is wet, and you have a time limit, a beginning and an end, so in a way it’s kind of like riding a wave. Joe Skoby
Brian Bielmann

PAGE 70

At Home With Daniel Jones

A hub for hell men, shapers, and legends on the North Shore.

Dick Graham

PAGE 90

Primo

Butch Van Artsdalen’s Hawaiian campaigns.

Jeff Divine

PAGE 18

The Gift

Self-imposed isolation, transactional wave riding, and how one surfboard served as a window into modern surf culture.

Back Issue

25.5

On the cover: Dave Rastovich, foiled for speed in New South Wales. Beyond page one, the issue treks through the deep backcountry of Tierra del Fuego, considers California’s surf-scape in the iconography of the American West, runs experiments on elephant guns with Mark Healey, and puts us deep underwater (and in the I.C.U.) with a man who tried to bodysurf Maverick’s.

Back Issue

25.5

On the cover: Dave Rastovich, foiled for speed in New South Wales. Beyond page one, the issue treks through the deep backcountry of Tierra del Fuego, considers California’s surf-scape in the iconography of the American West, runs experiments on elephant guns with Mark Healey, and puts us deep underwater (and in the I.C.U.) with a man who tried to bodysurf Maverick’s.

Features
Gauchos del Mar

PAGE 18

The Mitre Expedition

Fifty-three days on foot in the forgotten hinterlands

PAGE 30

Portfolio: Woody Gooch

The fresh eyes and immersive perspectives of an emergent shooter.

Woody Gooch
I’ve always wanted to shoot as if I’m looking through the eyes of a surfer. I want people to see a photo and say, ‘I’ve seen my friend from that angle. I know how that feels. I’ve lived it.’” Woody Gooch
Jeff Divine

PAGE 74

Divine Finds

Fresh discoveries and interstitial notes from our esteemed Photo Editor.

Rex Brandt | Surfriders | Courtesy of The E. Gene Crain Collection

PAGE 94

The Productive Revolution

Art and artifacts from surfing’s Beat Generation.

Dave Sandford

PAGE 60

Sea State

A Great Lake trends oceanic.

PAGE 100

West As All Hell

A return to the “frontiers” of California.

California is the West, the real West, more fantastic and improbable than any Hollywood myth. And it is true West not merely because it is the edge of the most violent and otherworldly continent on the planet, but because of California’s boundless spaces.” Dave Parmenter
Library of Congress

PAGE 50

Duke’s Ulcers

How surfing’s central icon and Hawaii’s most famous son
stomached a lifetime of poverty, exploitation, and racist overlords.

John Bilderback

PAGE 66

The Healey Variations

A big-wave firebrand asks his shapers to stretch a little.

PAGE 90

What Lies Beneath

Bodysurfing in the key of heavy.

Bryan Trenbreth
I have seven broken ribs, a broken scapula, a punctured lung, and a small fracture in my neck. I am deep beneath the surface, wallowing in the Cauldron, a chunk of dark, pitted reef associated with the wave called Maverick’s.” Ryan Masters
Back Issue

25.4

Cover shot: John John Florence, mid-blowout at Pipeline. Inner spreads peel back the rest of JJF’s operation via profiling by C.R. Stecyk and Chas Smith. Stopovers in the badlands of West Oz and the green-lands of New Zealand, golden age explorations through Central America, bullfighting and urchin diving with one of the last great California watermen, plus a talking Skil planer round out the book.

Back Issue

25.4

Cover shot: John John Florence, mid-blowout at Pipeline. Inner spreads peel back the rest of JJF’s operation via profiling by C.R. Stecyk and Chas Smith. Stopovers in the badlands of West Oz and the green-lands of New Zealand, golden age explorations through Central America, bullfighting and urchin diving with one of the last great California watermen, plus a talking Skil planer round out the book.

Features
Logan Murray

PAGE 42

Primordial Range

The georgic beauty of New Zealand’s Coromandel Peninsula.

Courtesy of Bud Hedrick

PAGE 96

Open Doors

Bullfighting, urchin diving, and post-war surf salvation with Bud Hedrick.

Russell Ord

PAGE 18

Return to Saltbush

Fear and menace in the Australian red desert.

PAGE 64

Look At John John!

A multifaceted analysis of one of the most-highly-studied surfers in the world.

Justin Jay
Do we despise John John for his extraordinary skill? Do we look at him defy the laws of human locomotion and cheer, roar, praise because mankind needs John Johns or do we look at him with eyes tinted green, wanting to take what he has for ourselves?" Chas Smith
Peter Halasz

PAGE 56

Gallery: Peter Halasz

Cliff dreams and twilit netherworlds.

Ted Grambeau

PAGE 62

I’m A High Mileage Unit

A life in full, as told by one heavily-spun Skil 100.

I am nobody. I am nothing. I am but a silent power tool, but I have a story.” Skil 100
Craig Peterson

PAGE 106

Leaving Home

The search for the perfect wave and the golden age of surf exploration

Jianca Lazarus

PAGE 30

Super Patch

Board restoration master Randy Rarick shines junkyard dogs into crazy diamonds.

Back Issue

25.3

On the cover: Waveform, Oaxaca, Mexico. Inside pages range from the diamond- and surf-rich coastlines of Africa to an atoll in the Indian Ocean. Tintypes from photographer Bernard Testemale, time-bending imagery from Jay Mark Johnson, and the back-alley noir and shorefront vibrancy of Town lend lights and darks.

Back Issue

25.3

On the cover: Waveform, Oaxaca, Mexico. Inside pages range from the diamond- and surf-rich coastlines of Africa to an atoll in the Indian Ocean. Tintypes from photographer Bernard Testemale, time-bending imagery from Jay Mark Johnson, and the back-alley noir and shorefront vibrancy of Town lend lights and darks.

Features
Sequence: Tom Servais

PAGE 72

Get Busy Living

The ballad and balls of Shane Dorian.

I really try and minimize my own risk by not chasing every swell and saying no to a lot of big swells. Unless something looks extra special I don’t even consider it. In my world, all you’ve got to do is catch one good wave per year and you’re good. Shane Dorian
Tony Heff

PAGE 18

Thoroughly Lived In

A return in body—and mind—to the outposts of Waikiki.

Nicolas Telford

PAGE 62

The Diamond Dogs

Simon James mines the South African northwest for precious stones (and perfect surf).

Morgan Maassen

PAGE 50

When The Baseline Thumps

Beyond the scrawl with surf designer Shawn Stüssy.

Shawn Parkin

PAGE 98

Where Silence Reigns

Acoustic ecologist Gordon Hempton is on a mission to protect one square inch of silence.

In that grove, even though we are outdoors, it is as quiet as most recording studios. The measured decibel is 27, which is the same measurement that I made in Benaroya Hall in Seattle, empty of performers. And that’s a 110 million dollar building built for the Seattle Symphony. This is the least noise polluted location of any place in the Lower 48. Gordon Hempton
Michael Kew

PAGE 92

Coffee With Darwin

An atoll assay in the Cocos-Keeling Islands.

Bernard Testemale

PAGE 110

The Big Wave Riders of Hawaii

Selections from Bernard Testemale’s collection of collodion wet plate photographs.

PAGE 38

Spacetime

Photographer Jay Mark Johnson captures a wave’s lifespan in a single frame.

Back Issue

25.2

On page one Alex Knost leverages low-center drive on a Campbell Brothers Bonzer. Highpoints inside include icy beachbreaks in the Russian Far East, A-frame tubes in the Roaring 40s, and an examination of just what the hell it means to be a waterman.

Back Issue

25.2

On page one Alex Knost leverages low-center drive on a Campbell Brothers Bonzer. Highpoints inside include icy beachbreaks in the Russian Far East, A-frame tubes in the Roaring 40s, and an examination of just what the hell it means to be a waterman.

Features
Dylan Gordon

Page 40

Return to Kamchatka

Dodging bears, poachers, and military patrols in the Russian Far East.

After crossing a six-foot deep river and climbing a steep hill we started being followed by a patrol vehicle. Anton whispered for us not to talk—if they were caught with Americans we could all be imprisoned indefinitely. Cyrus Sutton
Jeff Divine

Page 56

In The Pink

Peter Townend—world champion, spin-doctor, huckster, surfer—has spent a lifetime basking in his own glow.

Bob Kemp

Page 34

What the Hell is a Waterman?

Dissecting one of surfing’s most loaded labels.

Andrew Shield

Page 18

The A-Frame Strike

Craig Anderson, on getting in and out in the Roaring 40s.

I did the graveyard shift behind the wheel from 2 a.m. to sometime after sunrise. The swings of delirium and shear craziness are pretty enjoyable late at night—and somewhat funny when you embrace them. Craig Anderson
JENS ZIEHE/Courtesy of Neugerriemschneider Gallery

Page 74

Gallery: Thaddeus Strode

Surf-adjacent, impulse-expressionism from the West L.A. kaleidoscope.

Tatsuo Takei

Page 88

Portfolio: Tatsuo Takei

Modern nostalgia, filtered through the 650mm Century lens of a deliberate retrogressive.

Samora Chapman

Page 80

Ntando

Teenaged street life—with the piers of Durban as salvation—through the eyes of one impoverished South African surfer.

I made the rails knife-edge sharp, taking a razor blade to zip off the jellied glass hanging off the deck. I made many of them, getting smaller and smaller in length, stopping at 5 feet 10 inches. Nat Young
Leroy Grannis

Page 102

The Low Rail Theory

How a gathering of the vanguard in 1968 offered a look at the future of surfboards.

Back Issue

25.1

On the cover, Craig Anderson resets for a secondary roll-in on his 5'4" in maxing Indo. The interior spreads navigate car wrecks in the Australian red desert, deep powder and frigid rail turns in Japan’s Arctic Circle, and the (arguably) superior physics of the single-fin. More, of course, inside.

Back Issue

25.1

On the cover, Craig Anderson resets for a secondary roll-in on his 5'4" in maxing Indo. The interior spreads navigate car wrecks in the Australian red desert, deep powder and frigid rail turns in Japan’s Arctic Circle, and the (arguably) superior physics of the single-fin. More, of course, inside.

Features
D.J. Struntz

Page 100

Portfolio: D.J. Struntz (Revisited)

Globetrot imagery from one of surfing’s most prolific shooters.

Jeremiah Klein

Page 60

Beast Slayer

Hawaiian lifeguard and big-wave specialist Dave Wassel has been chasing monster surf for most of his life. Has he finally caught his limit?

Jon Mozo

Page 98

Kia Kaha

An affirmation from beyond the grave from fallen water photographer Jon Mozo.

Ed Sloane

Page 40

Edges of Disaster

When surf culture throw-aheads cross the Aussie continent for desert pits, strange lines and heated exchanges surely follow.

Alan Van Gysen

PAGE 18

Must We Burn The Single Blade?

An argument for the neutral drive of the single-fin.

What price are you willing to pay for multi-fin performance if it comes at the cost of having to surf like everyone else? Dave Parmenter
LaBianca Collection

Page 76

Gallery: Lawrence LaBianca

The environmental progressions of a multimedia artist and naturalist.

John Wehrheim

Page 50

Taylor Camp

In 1969 a village of tree houses became a safe zone for those in search of perfect surf and “good vibrations.”

Paul Ferraris

Page 34

La Maestra

Mayra Guadalupe Aguilar Villavicencio is a teacher on land and in the water.

Surfer Archives

Page 92

Outside Dimension

A handful of surfers were at Rincon for the Swell of the Century. Thankfully, one of them was a writer.

The center of the storm dropped to an amazingly low 64 kilopascals of mercury and we began plotting its path, hoping to forecast the swell’s arrival. We had no idea what to expect. No one had seen anything like it. Mike Davis
Shane Peel

Page 86

Crosspollination

Surf and snowboard cultures intersect at the edge of Japan’s arctic circle.

Back Issue

24.6

The U.S. War Department (and its contributions to surf meteorology), the rebirth of Cape St. Francis, one terrifying European slab, and a dystopian wave garden all make it into the consommé in Volume 24.6. Kassia Meador, Jamie O’Brien, plein air artist John Comer, and assorted waveforms deepen the stock.

Back Issue

24.6

The U.S. War Department (and its contributions to surf meteorology), the rebirth of Cape St. Francis, one terrifying European slab, and a dystopian wave garden all make it into the consommé in Volume 24.6. Kassia Meador, Jamie O’Brien, plein air artist John Comer, and assorted waveforms deepen the stock.

Features

Feature Articles from the new Surfer’s Journal

Page 62

The Real Jamie O’Brien

The story of the “White Mr. Pipeline” is not for safe, suburban ears.

PAGE 90

Beach Party

Engineer and oceanographic Willard Bascom, the U.S. War Department, and the wildcat origins of surf science.

PAGE 76

Found in Translation

The Endless Summer’s Cape St. Francis has always been a wave of dreams. This season it became a reality.

Few waves were ridden successfully on this, the biggest day, but those that were yielded racing walls from top to bottom. In years long gone, before the houses and locked-in sand, Bruce’s would break all the time on smaller swells. Now it takes the right direction and size to get the old lady going, but every five to ten years she loves to show off and amaze. Alan van Gysen

PAGE 42

P.O.P.

For a few Angeleño surfers, a shuttered pleasure pier became a surreal, sometimes-scary, and occasionally-magical surfscape.

PAGE 18

Costa Da Morte

A European crew discovers lethal slabs on Basque Spain’s death coast.

Page 52

Gallery: John Comer

Vaquero pastorals from the artist’s recent show in San Jose del Cabo.

I’m exercising new ways, for me, of conveying information. There’s a desert brilliance. That’s what I embrace, because it’s something representative of place. Painting must be regional. It must be specific. That’s what makes it universal. John Comer

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Portfolio: Mick Curley

Reflections from an Indo shooter: “I always try to capture the feeling of the moment, not just the action but how it felt to be present at that time and place.”

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k*meador

Grace incarnate, Kassia Meador has proven that she can hustle while she flows.